By Joseph Brownstein

While it may not come as a surprise that survivors of childhood traumas have more difficult lives, a new study says that those children can also expect their lives to be on average, almost 20 years shorter.

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that children who experience six or more traumatic events in their childhood — events that can include emotional, physical or sexual abuse or household dysfunction — have an average lifespan 19 years shorter than those of their counterparts who do not suffer that degree of childhood trauma.

“The stressors tend to accumulate in people’s lives, and it appears that affects the way they develop and can affect the way they think and their emotional control,” said Dr. Robert Anda, who has served as the co-primary investigator on the CDC’s Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study.

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Trends in U.S. Emergency Department Visits Related to Suspected or Confirmed Child Abuse and Neglect Among Children and Adolescents Aged <18 Years Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, January 2019–September 2020

By The C.D.C. Heightened stress, school closures, loss of income, and social isolation resulting from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have increased the risk for child abuse and neglect (1). [...]

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